3. I Do Not Come to You By Chance By Adaobi Tricia Nwadubusi: Kingsley Okpara is thrust into a world of internet fraud after his graduation due to years of joblessness and the need for money.

  • Won the 2010  Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for Best First Book (Africa)
  • Won Betty Trask First Book award
  • The Washington Post’s Top Books of 2009

4. Easy Motion by Leye Adenle: A 2016 Nigeria Noir, published by Cassava Republic Press and written by Nigerian writer Leye Adenle
Easy Motion Tourist a thriller that serves up Lagos in its heat and that became the perfect introduction to the world of Naija Noir. The book, which has since been translated into French and Spanish and won Le Prix Marianne at the Salon du Polar du Pau in 2016, was praised by Publishers Weekly (“This relentlessly paced tale of people at cross-purposes and uncertain loyalties provides a searing look at how power corrupts”), The Guardian (“Fast and furious, told from a kaleidoscope of different points of view. . . a rollercoaster ride through a world of extremes”), and The Crime Review (“Gritty, gripping, and hard to put down. . . with a narrative structure that feels fresh. . . a welcome twist on the contemporary thriller”)
No achievements so far but received a lot of praises and amazing reviews
A 3.8 rating on goodreads and 4.67 on okodabooks

5. Carnivorous City by Toni Kan: This one is a love letter to Lagos and she’s the kind of city more likely to headbutt you in the mouth than to kiss you.
The book is about Abel Dike, a small-town teacher with a suitably boring life in the countryside. When he gets called to the city to look for his missing younger brother. Soni’s no darling, a criminal who’s done some crazy things, and this book gives you no one to root for. There are no good guys or bad guys, we don’t yet have the vocabulary for this new kind of morality. Running parallel to the missing persons investigation is an investigation into the soul of Lagos itself. If you like literary crime a bit gonzo, it’s all in The Carnivorous City.
There are no good guys or bad guys, we don’t yet have the vocabulary for this new kind of morality. Running parallel to the missing persons investigation is an investigation into the soul of Lagos itself. If you like literary crime a bit gonzo, it’s all in The Carnivorous City.

6. When Trouble Sleeps by Leye Adenle: When Trouble Sleeps is a thrilling plunge—with a complex, intriguing female character in This is about Amaka—into a world of sex workers, greed, political intrigue, blackmail and murder, moving at a relentless pace full of twists. The courageous, determined Amaka continues her one-woman-crusade—begun in Easy Motion Tourist—to protect sex workers and other vulnerable women while seeking out ways to bring justice to abusers and corrupt politicians.

Coming less than a year before Nigeria’s 2019 general election, When Trouble Sleeps offers a foretaste of the drama, intrigue and corruption that often characterize Nigeria’s elections since the country returned to democratic rule in 1999.

  1. Making Wolf by Tade Thompson: This novel was first published by the speculative fiction publisher Rosarium and marketed as sci-fi. Tade Thompson is a rising star in that genre and Making Wolf picked up the Golden Tentacle for a Debut Novel at the 2015 Kitschies . But, the thrust of the novel leans so heavily on crime that it joins a host of quality crossover books like China Mieville’s The City and The City or Richard K Morgan’s Altered Carbon. In the novel, Weston Kogi is a security guard in London, but when he goes back home he tells people he’s a detective with Scotland Yard – as you do. White lies tend to have extreme consequences in Nigerian noir, and so Weston finds himself hired to investigate the murder of local hero Papa Busi. Failure isn’t an option, especially in the middle of a civil war with rival armed factions who all have a stake in the outcome of the investigation. The body count in this novel makes Tarantino seem like a choir boy. If you love your eggs hard-boiled, this book is just for you.
  2. A New Man by Femi Ademiluyi: It tells the story of Ayo Badejo, who gets posted to a corrupt community in a corrupt nation to render his services as produce inspector. He was determined to change the world but the world changed him. Winner of 1994 ANA Award. Yet, its main action came late.
  3. A Conspiracy of Ravens by Othuke Ominiabohs: In the Niger Delta creeks of Southern Nigeria, nine expatriates are being held hostage by militants fighting for control over the resources from their land. … Together, they must race against time to save not just the hostages but a nation on the brink of a bloody Civil War.

10: A Conspiracy of Ravens by C.M Okonkwo: The detectives believe that someone is out for those involved in the closed-door mystery, so they try to stay ahead of the game. However, after a body is found behind a locked door, the whole game is entirely changed.

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